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Pablo Escobar (Pablo Emilio Escobar Gaviria,El Patrón, Don Pablo, El Señor, El Robin Hood Criollo)

Drug lord, outlaw

Background

  • Pablo Escobar was born in 1949. The son of a teacher and a peasant, his life of crime began early.

  • Education

    • Pablo and his brother were once sent home from school because Pablo had no shoes and no money to buy them. Soon he moved into marijuana, and at the age of 16 he was expelled from school.

      Escobar studied political science at the university but was forced to drop out when he could not afford to pay the required fees. This was when he began his criminal career, allegedly stealing gravestones and sanding them down for resale to smugglers.

    Career

    • While he was still in school he stole tombstones and sold them to smugglers from Panama. In the early 1970s he entered the cocaine trade. His ambition and ruthlessness amid the cocaine trade would make him one of the wealthiest, most powerful, and most violent criminals of all-time.

      Under his leadership, large amounts of coca paste were purchased in Bolivia and Peru, processed, and brought to the United States. Escobar collaborated with five or six other illegal entrepreneurs from the Medellin area, forming the infamous Medellin Cartel.

      Escobar eventually controlled over 80% of the cocaine shipped to the U.S. He was named one of the ten richest people on earth by Fortune and Forbes magazines. But his rise to infamy cost the lives of three Colombian presidential candidates, an attorney general, a justice minister, more than 200 judges, dozens of journalists, and over 1,000 police officers.

    Major achievements

    • For the people of Medellin, the urban namesake of Pablo's cocaine cartel, Escobar would become a hero, a builder of hospitals, and a leader of men. In the early 60's, Colombian farmers grew and sold coca plants and extracts to outside interests, never really paying attention to what the vegetation was used for. When Escobar came of age in the late 60's, he quickly realized that all this coca was being snorted up the noses of the rapidly expanding drug culture in America. As such, he decided that the best way to make money off of the sale and processing was to control all sides of the business. He quickly took over the coca fields around Medellin, paying farmers and workers double what they were making on their own. Escobar then opened processing labs and facilities nearby to turn the plants into sweet, sweet nose candy. But by 1982, Pablo Escobar was raking in billions of dollars from American coke heads, and he used those funds to win the hearts and minds of Medellin residents. He built hospitals, schools, and low income housing projects for his loyal workers. By year’s end, he was even elected to a seat in the Colombian congress. In 1989, Forbes magazine listed Escobar as the seventh richest man in the world. Despite his wealth, Pablo was living the life of a fugitive. There were arrest warrants issued for him in both Colombia and the United States. He was offered clemency if he turned himself into the Colombian authorities and gave up his empire. After a botched assassination attempt by a rival cartel, Pablo turned himself in to Colombian authorities. While on the run, he placed a bounty on the heads of all police officers, American citizens, and military personnel within Medellin. He paid $300 a head For the poor folks of this Colombian town, the bounty was a god-send. Dozens of cops and officials were slaughtered and decapitated while Pablo was on the run. It was easy to spot Pablo's hideouts after he'd left them; they were all run-down houses with shiny new bathrooms. In 1993, Pablo Escobar made a cell phone call from an apartment building in Medellin. The Colombian secret police stormed the building and shot Escobar dead within moments.

    Politics

    In 1978, he was elected as a substitute city council member in Medellín. In 1982, he was elected to Congress. As a congressman, Escobar had automatic judicial immunity and could no longer be prosecuted for crimes under Colombian law. He was also entitled to a diplomatic visa, which he used to take trips with his family to the United States.

    Party affiliation: Liberal Party

    Religion

    He said: "Sometimes I am God, if I say a man dies, he dies that same day."

    Views

    Quotations: Some of Pablo Escobar's memorable quotations are:

    "I prefer to be in the grave in Colombia than in a jail cell in the United States."

    "I'm a decent man who exports flowers."

    "All empires are created of blood and fire."

    "I can replace things, but I could never replace my wife and kids."

    "Everyone has a price, the important thing is to find out what it is."

    "There can only be one king."

    "There are two hundred million idiots, manipulated by a million intelligent men."

    Membership

    • Colombian Liberal Party , Colombia
      1982 - 1984

    Personality

    Interests

    He said: "I like Bulls, but most of all I like cars. In my family, all addicted to speed. For example, my brother likes bikes, so at some point I decided to give him the bicycle factory (Bicicletas Ositto) in Manizales."

    Connections

    • mother: Hemilda Gaviria - teacher
    • father: Abel de Jesús Dari Escobar - farmer
    • Wife: Maria Victoria Henao
      now María Isabel Santos Caballero
    • Sun: Juan Pablo
      now Juan Sebastian Marroquín Santos
    • Doughter: Manuela Escobar
      now Juana Manuela Marroquín Santos
    • Brothers and sisters: Roberto de Jesús, Gloria Inés, Argemiro, Alba Marina, Luz María and Luis Fernando
    • Grandfather: Roberto Gaviria Cobaleda - smuggler
    See on larger map
    Born December 1, 1949
    Died December 2, 1993
    (aged 44)
    Nationality
    • 1966 - 1977
      car theft, smuggling and kidnapping
    • 1977 - 1993
      Head of the Medellín Cartel, Medellín Cartel

    Contributor  

    Anna Levshik last changed 28/11/2012 view changes
    Alex Yanul last changed 06/11/2015 view changes
    Aleksandr Novoselov last changed 15/11/2015 view changes
    • Album
      • Photo: with his family
    • Place
    • School
      • School in Envigado
        • present
        • Main photo
    • College/University
      • University of Antioquia
        • present
        • Main photo
    • Career
      • car theft, smuggling and kidnapping
        • Address
        • mainPhoto
      • Medellín Cartel
        • Address
        • mainPhoto
    • Major Achievements
      • For the people of Medellin, the urban namesake of Pablo's cocaine cartel, Escobar would become a hero, a builder of hospitals, and a leader of men. In the early 60's, Colombian farmers grew and sold coca plants and extracts to outside interests, never really paying attention to what the vegetation was used for. When Escobar came of age in the late 60's, he quickly realized that all this coca was being snorted up the noses of the rapidly expanding drug culture in America. As such, he decided that the best way to make money off of the sale and processing was to control all sides of the business. He quickly took over the coca fields around Medellin, paying farmers and workers double what they were making on their own. Escobar then opened processing labs and facilities nearby to turn the plants into sweet, sweet nose candy. But by 1982, Pablo Escobar was raking in billions of dollars from American coke heads, and he used those funds to win the hearts and minds of Medellin residents. He built hospitals, schools, and low income housing projects for his loyal workers. By year’s end, he was even elected to a seat in the Colombian congress. In 1989, Forbes magazine listed Escobar as the seventh richest man in the world. Despite his wealth, Pablo was living the life of a fugitive. There were arrest warrants issued for him in both Colombia and the United States. He was offered clemency if he turned himself into the Colombian authorities and gave up his empire. After a botched assassination attempt by a rival cartel, Pablo turned himself in to Colombian authorities. While on the run, he placed a bounty on the heads of all police officers, American citizens, and military personnel within Medellin. He paid $300 a head For the poor folks of this Colombian town, the bounty was a god-send. Dozens of cops and officials were slaughtered and decapitated while Pablo was on the run. It was easy to spot Pablo's hideouts after he'd left them; they were all run-down houses with shiny new bathrooms. In 1993, Pablo Escobar made a cell phone call from an apartment building in Medellin. The Colombian secret police stormed the building and shot Escobar dead within moments.
        • mainPhoto
    • address
    • Family description
    • Membership
      • Colombian Liberal Party
        • description
        • mainPhoto
    • Membership description
    • Relatives
      • Hemilda Gaviria
        • mainPhoto
      • Abel de Jesús Dari Escobar
        • mainPhoto
      • Maria Victoria Henao
        • mainPhoto
      • Juan Pablo
        • mainPhoto
      • Manuela Escobar
        • mainPhoto
      • Roberto de Jesús, Gloria Inés, Argemiro, Alba Marina, Luz María and Luis Fernando
        • mainPhoto
      • Roberto Gaviria Cobaleda
        • mainPhoto
    • School description
    • College/University Description
    • Personality
    • Quotes from others about the person
    • Physical Characteristics
    • Place
    • School
      • School in Envigado
        • present
        • Main photo
    • College/University
      • University of Antioquia
        • present
        • Main photo
    • Career
      • car theft, smuggling and kidnapping
        • Address
        • mainPhoto
      • Medellín Cartel
        • Address
        • mainPhoto
    • Major Achievements
      • For the people of Medellin, the urban namesake of Pablo's cocaine cartel, Escobar would become a hero, a builder of hospitals, and a leader of men. In the early 60's, Colombian farmers grew and sold coca plants and extracts to outside interests, never really paying attention to what the vegetation was used for. When Escobar came of age in the late 60's, he quickly realized that all this coca was being snorted up the noses of the rapidly expanding drug culture in America. As such, he decided that the best way to make money off of the sale and processing was to control all sides of the business. He quickly took over the coca fields around Medellin, paying farmers and workers double what they were making on their own. Escobar then opened processing labs and facilities nearby to turn the plants into sweet, sweet nose candy. But by 1982, Pablo Escobar was raking in billions of dollars from American coke heads, and he used those funds to win the hearts and minds of Medellin residents. He built hospitals, schools, and low income housing projects for his loyal workers. By year’s end, he was even elected to a seat in the Colombian congress. In 1989, Forbes magazine listed Escobar as the seventh richest man in the world. Despite his wealth, Pablo was living the life of a fugitive. There were arrest warrants issued for him in both Colombia and the United States. He was offered clemency if he turned himself into the Colombian authorities and gave up his empire. After a botched assassination attempt by a rival cartel, Pablo turned himself in to Colombian authorities. While on the run, he placed a bounty on the heads of all police officers, American citizens, and military personnel within Medellin. He paid $300 a head For the poor folks of this Colombian town, the bounty was a god-send. Dozens of cops and officials were slaughtered and decapitated while Pablo was on the run. It was easy to spot Pablo's hideouts after he'd left them; they were all run-down houses with shiny new bathrooms. In 1993, Pablo Escobar made a cell phone call from an apartment building in Medellin. The Colombian secret police stormed the building and shot Escobar dead within moments.
        • mainPhoto
    • address
    • Family description
    • Membership
      • Colombian Liberal Party
        • description
        • mainPhoto
    • Membership description
    • Relatives
      • Hemilda Gaviria
        • mainPhoto
      • Abel de Jesús Dari Escobar
        • mainPhoto
      • Maria Victoria Henao
        • mainPhoto
      • Juan Pablo
        • mainPhoto
      • Manuela Escobar
        • mainPhoto
      • Roberto de Jesús, Gloria Inés, Argemiro, Alba Marina, Luz María and Luis Fernando
        • mainPhoto
      • Roberto Gaviria Cobaleda
        • mainPhoto
    • School description
    • College/University Description
    • Personality
    • Quotes from others about the person
    • Physical Characteristics
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